Legal Drinking Age in South Sudan

by Sophia

Legal Drinking Age in South Sudan

Drinking in South Sudan can be an enjoyable and rewarding experience as long as you know the laws, customs, and challenges that come with it. You should respect the legal drinking age of 18 years old and follow the rules and regulations that govern the production, sale, and consumption of alcohol in the country.

South Sudan is a young country that gained independence from Sudan in 2011 after decades of civil war. The government has a diverse and rich culture but faces many challenges like poverty, violence, and instability. One of the aspects of South Sudanese culture that may interest travelers and visitors is alcohol consumption.

Can 15-Year-Olds Drink in South Sudan?

The legal drinking age in South Sudan is 18 years old, which means that anyone under this age is not allowed to buy, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. This applies to locals and foreigners, regardless of their religion or nationality. The legal drinking age in South Sudan is the same as in most African countries, such as Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. However, unlike some of these countries, South Sudan does not have a separate age limit for different types of alcohol, such as beer, wine, or spirits. All alcoholic beverages are subject to the same age restriction of 18.

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What are the South Sudan Alcohol Laws?

The legal drinking age in South Sudan is not the only law that regulates the production, sale, and consumption of alcohol in the country. Some other rules and regulations govern the alcohol industry and drinkers’ behavior. Some of these laws are:

Alcohol licenses:

Anyone who wants to produce, import, export, distribute, or sell alcohol in South Sudan must obtain a license from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning. The license fee varies depending on the type and quantity of alcohol involved. For example, a license to produce beer costs 100,000 South Sudanese pounds (SSP) per year, while a license to sell beer costs 10,000. The permit must be renewed annually and displayed in a visible place at the licensee’s premises.

Alcohol Taxes:

The government of South Sudan imposes taxes on alcohol products, which are collected by the customs authorities at the point of entry or exit. The tax rates vary depending on the type and strength of alcohol. For example, the tax rate for beer is 50% of the cost, insurance, and freight (CIF) value, while the tax rate for spirits is 100% of the CIF value. The tax revenue is used to fund the development and security of the country.

Alcohol Advertising:

The government of South Sudan prohibits the advertising of alcohol products in any form of media, such as television, radio, newspapers, magazines, billboards, or online platforms. The only exception is for alcohol products that are produced locally and have a low alcohol content, such as sorghum beer. These products can be advertised in a limited and discreet manner as long as they do not target minors, pregnant women, or drivers.

Alcohol Consumption:

The government of South Sudan allows the consumption of alcohol in private and public places as long as it does not disturb the peace, order, and security of society. However, there are some restrictions and guidelines that drinkers should follow, such as:

    1. Drinking in moderation and avoiding intoxication and addiction.
    2. I drank only in designated areas, such as bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs, and not in places of worship, schools, hospitals, or government offices.
    3. Drink only with people who are of legal drinking age and not with minors, pregnant women, or drivers.
    4. Drinking only with people who share the same religion and not with Muslims, who are forbidden from consuming alcohol by their faith,
    5. They are drinking only with people who consent and not forcing or coercing anyone to drink against their will.
    6. Drinking only with respect and courtesy and not causing harm, offense, or nuisance to others.

Where Can You Drink in South Sudan?

If you are of legal drinking age and want to enjoy a drink in South Sudan, you have several options. You can drink in your private space, such as your home, hotel room, or guest house, as long as you do not disturb your neighbors or violate local rules. You can also drink in public places, such as bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs, as long as you have a valid ID and follow the abovementioned laws and regulations.

However, you should know that the availability and quality of alcohol products in South Sudan may vary depending on the location, season, and supply. You may not find the same brands or varieties of alcohol you are used to in your home country, and you may have to pay higher prices for imported or premium products. You may also encounter some challenges or risks when drinking in public places, such as:

Limited Options:

The number and variety of bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs that serve alcohol in South Sudan may be limited, especially in rural areas or conflict zones. You may have to travel long distances or cross checkpoints to find a place that sells alcohol, and you may not see the type or quality of alcohol that you prefer. You may also have to deal with poor infrastructure, such as a lack of electricity, water, or sanitation, which may affect the hygiene and safety of the alcohol products and the premises.

Cultural Differences:

The drinking culture and customs in South Sudan may differ from what you are used to in your home country. You may encounter different types of alcohol products, such as sorghum beer, palm wine, or araqi, which are made from local ingredients and have a distinct taste and potency. You may also encounter different drinking habits, such as drinking in groups, sharing drinks, or drinking for social or ceremonial purposes. You should be respectful and open-minded when drinking with locals and try to learn and follow their drinking etiquette and traditions.

Social Issues:

The consumption of alcohol in South Sudan may be associated with some social issues, such as poverty, violence, crime, or health problems. You may witness or experience some negative consequences of alcohol abuse, such as domestic violence, sexual assault, robbery, or disease. You may also face some stigma or discrimination from some segments of society, such as religious groups, who may disapprove of or condemn your drinking behavior. You should be cautious and responsible when drinking in public places and avoid any situations that may put you or others in danger or trouble.

When Can You Buy Alcohol in South Sudan?

If you want to buy alcohol in South Sudan, you have to follow the laws and regulations that govern the sale of alcohol in the country. You must be of legal drinking age, which is 18 years old, and you must show a valid ID to prove your age and identity. It would be best to buy alcohol from licensed sellers, such as bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs, and not from illegal or unlicensed sources, such as street vendors, smugglers, or home brewers.

You should also be aware of the operating hours and days of the sellers, which may vary depending on the location, season, and demand. Generally, you can buy alcohol from Monday to Friday, between 10:00 and 18:00, but some sellers may have different or extended hours, especially during weekends or holidays. You should also be aware of the quantity and quality of the alcohol products you buy and ensure they are not expired, contaminated, or adulterated. You should also check the prices and taxes of the alcohol products and make sure that you are not overcharged or cheated.

How Do You Ask for a Beer in South Sudan?

If you want to ask for a beer in South Sudan, you must know how to communicate with the seller and the locals. The official languages of South Sudan are English and Arabic. Still, many other local languages and dialects are spoken in the country, such as Dinka, Nuer, Bari, Zande, and Shilluk. You may encounter language barriers or misunderstandings when asking for a beer in South Sudan, especially if you do not speak or understand the local language or accent. Therefore, you should learn some essential words and phrases to help you ask for a beer in South Sudan.

  1. Hello: Marhaba (Arabic), Ciao (English), Male (Dinka), Male (Nuer), Kudual (Bari), Moyo (Zande), Ayo (Shilluk)
  2. Beer: Bira (Arabic), Beer (English), Bia (Dinka), Bia (Nuer), Bia (Bari), Bia (Zande), Bia (Shilluk)
  3. One: Wahid (Arabic), One (English), Dhiec (Dinka), Gat (Nuer), Mo (Bari), Mo (Zande), Mo (Shilluk)
  4. Two: Ithnain (Arabic), Two (English), Nyar (Dinka), Nyar (Nuer), Ri (Bari), Ri (Zande), Ri (Shilluk)
  5. Three: Thalatha (Arabic), Three (English), Dhieer (Dinka), Dhieer (Nuer), Taa (Bari), Taa (Zande), Taa (Shilluk)
  6. Please: Min flak (Arabic), Please (English), Yom (Dinka), Yom (Nuer), Yom (Bari), Yom (Zande), Yom (Shilluk)
  7. Thank you: Shukran (Arabic), Thank you (English), Yec (Dinka), Yec (Nuer), Yec (Bari), Yec (Zande

Conclusion

In summary, the legal drinking age in South Sudan is 18 years old, and various laws and regulations govern the production, sale, and consumption of alcohol in the country. Drinking in South Sudan can be a rewarding and enjoyable experience as long as you respect the laws, customs, and challenges that come with it.

FAQ

Q: How old do you have to be to drink in South Sudan?

A: You have to be 18 years old or older to drink in South Sudan.

Q: What kinds of alcohol can you find in South Sudan?

A: You can find imported and local alcohol, such as beer, wine, spirits, sorghum beer, palm wine, and araqi.

Q: How much does alcohol cost in South Sudan?

A: Alcohol prices vary depending on the type and quality of the product and the taxes and fees involved. Generally, imported and premium products are more expensive than local, low-quality ones.

Q: Where can you buy alcohol in South Sudan?

A: You can buy alcohol from licensed sellers, such as bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs, and not from illegal or unlicensed sources, such as street vendors, smugglers, or home brewers.

Q: Where can you drink alcohol in South Sudan?

A: You can drink alcohol in your private space, such as your home, hotel room, or guest house, or in public places, such as bars, restaurants, hotels, or clubs, as long as you follow the laws and regulations.

Q: How do you ask for a beer in South Sudan?

A: You should learn some essential words and phrases in the official and local languages, such as English, Arabic, Dinka, Nuer, Bari, Zande, and Shilluk, to help you ask for a beer in South Sudan.

Q: What are the drinking customs and etiquette in South Sudan?

A: You should be respectful and open-minded when drinking with locals and learn and follow their drinking customs and etiquette. You should also avoid drinking with people who are underage, pregnant, or driving, or people who have a different religion or do not consent to party with you.

Q: What are the social problems and consequences of alcohol abuse in South Sudan?

A: Alcohol abuse in South Sudan may cause or worsen social problems and consequences, such as poverty, violence, crime, or health problems. You may also face some stigma or discrimination from some segments of society, such as religious groups, who may disapprove of or condemn your drinking behavior.

Q: What are the policies and interventions to address the alcohol and drug problem in South Sudan?

A: The government of South Sudan and other organizations, such as the WHO, the UN, and the SSAPA, have implemented policies and interventions to address the alcohol and drug problem in South Sudan, such as laws and regulations, taxes and fees, programs and campaigns, and treatment and support.

Q: How can you drink responsibly and respectfully in South Sudan?

A: You can drink responsibly and respectfully in South Sudan by drinking in moderation and avoiding intoxication and addiction, drinking only in designated areas and with people who are of legal drinking age and share the same religion and consent, and drinking only with respect and courtesy and not causing any harm, offense, or nuisance to others.

Sophia

Sophia writes for Adam Magazine. She likes to learn and write about age. She tells stories about people, animals, and laws related to age. She wants to make the readers of Adam Magazine happy and interested.